With the recent announcement that Charter communications will be increasing their broadcast fee again for the second time in four months, most customers are not in good light with the cable TV provider. The increase also sees the possibility of Charter facing a new class-action lawsuit. The Hattis Law firm is asking Charter Spectrum customers who are upset about the fee to contact the firm regarding the issue.

According to the firm, “Hattis Law is investigating complaints that Charter Spectrum charges a hidden and misleading ‘Broadcast TV Surcharge’ fee to its cable customers and repeatedly raises its rates on Time Warner [Cable] legacy customers. Spectrum just raised its ‘Broadcast TV Surcharge’ fee at the end of 2018 from $8.85 to $9.95 a month. Customers report that Spectrum fails to adequately disclose this fee, and then states or implies that the fee is a government-related charge. In reality, this fee is entirely made up and is simply a double-charge for the channels Spectrum already promised to provide in its advertised price”
The firm is also investigating allegations from previous Time Warner Cable customers that “fixed rates are not being honored despite Spectrum staff promising no increases.”

In an explanation as to why it does charge the broadcast fee Charter had this to say to its customers;
“As a direct result of local broadcast or “network-affiliated” TV stations in recent years dramatically increasing the rates to Charter Communications to distribute their signals to our customers, we’re forced to pass those charges on as a “Broadcast TV Surcharge.” These local TV signals were historically made available to us at no cost or low cost. However, in recent years the prices demanded by local broadcast TV stations have necessitated that we pass these costs on to customers.”

Despite all this, there is one thing Charter customers still get to enjoy, as Charter customers do not have to pay a regional sports network fee. Charter has 16.1 million residential cable TV customers and 23.6 million residential Internet customers.

Source

Arstechnica

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *